TURBT (Trans-urethral Resection of Bladder Tumour)

(Removal of Bladder Tumour)

Summary

A TURBT (Trans-Urethral Resection of Bladder Tumour) procedure is carried out to investigate and resect (scrape away) a tumour in your bladder. There are two types of bladder tumours:

  • Non-invasive bladder tumours are the most common type; the tumour lies within the lining of the bladder and is therefore not life-threatening. However 10-15% of these tumours are at risk of becoming invasive
  • Invasive bladder tumours grow through the lining of the bladder and may spread to other parts of the body

Your consultant has probably suggested a TURBT procedure because you have had one or more of these symptoms:

  • Passing blood in your urine (haematuria)• Loss of normal bladder function – possibly because of blood clots in your bladder
  • A burning sensation whilst passing urine

If your bladder tumour is non-invasive your urologist will resect (scrape away) the tumour and so reduce the risk of it becoming invasive. If however the tumour is found to be invasive, your urologist will take biopsies from different areas of your bladder for examination under a microscope to identify how far the it has spread and determine the best course of treatment for you.

  • Arranging your Treatment

    Before going ahead with this treatment, you will need to have an initial consultation with a specialist Consultant to go through your medical history and diagnosis. At this appointment, your consultant will confirm the exact treatment you require.
    If you would like to have an initial consultation, you can call us and we can help you find the consultant best for you.

    Alternatively, if you have already been diagnosed as needing a particular operation or treatment, our Reservations team can give you a guide price for this to be carried out at KIMS Hospital and book an appointment for you to meet a consultant.
    Call our Reservations team on +44 (0) 1622 237 727 or email reservations@kims.org.uk.

  • Paying for your Treatment

    You can be treated at KIMS by using your private medical insurance or by paying for yourself.

    If you have private medical insurance, you will need to contact your insurer to ensure you are covered for the initial consultation prior to making an appointment and obtain an authorisation number. The insurance company will then need to be advised if you require further treatment. The insurance company usually settles bills on your behalf.

    If you are paying for your own treatment, you will need to pay for an initial consultation. This will be confirmed at the time of booking but is typically £150-£250. You will also need to pay for any associated diagnostic tests your consultant recommends (for example x-rays and blood tests).

    Following this consultation, if you don’t need any further treatment or if you decide paying for yourself isn’t the right option, there is no commitment to proceed further.

    If you require the operation or procedure to be carried out, you will receive a quote for your treatment. This quote is also subject to pre-assessment checks prior to your admission to hospital.

    Payment is required 7 days prior to admission.

The TURBT will be performed under general or spinal anaesthetic; you can discuss the options with our anaesthetist prior to the operation. This procedure will only take up to 30 minutes.

A resectoscope (small telescope) will be passed through your urethra into your bladder.

Through the resectopscope your consultant will identify and resect the tumour and take biopsies for examination. Any raw areas after resection will be cauterised (by passing an electric current) to minimise bleeding.

When you are in recovery you will find that the urologist has inserted a catheter into your bladder so you can pass urine easily. Your bladder will be washed out with a fluid to prevent blood clots forming.

The catheter will be removed after a day or two. For the next few days passing urine may sting; drinking plenty of water will assist this and reduce the probability of blood clots forming. It is important to take it easy and not do anything strenuous, but you should be able to return to work and do a little exercise after two weeks.

Your biopsy results will be take a few days to come back. You will be able to discuss them with your urologist at your follow-up appointment, when further treatment will be planned. Even if your bladder tumour is non-invasive, your consultant may recommend that you receive preventative chemotherapy directly into the bladder via a catheter (intravesical chemotherapy) to reduce the risk of further tumours developing.

You are likely to require further cystoscopies, probably on a regular basis, to ensure you do not have any new tumours appearing. If you have an invasive tumour, the various options for treatment will be discussed fully with you.

To find out more:

If you would like to come to KIMS contact our Reservations team on +44 (0)1622 237 727 or email reservations@kims.org.uk

Our Consultants

  • Mr John Donohue

    MB BCh FRCSI FRCS

    • Circumcision
    • Prostate Resection (TURP)
    • Radical Prostatectomy
    • TURBT (Trans-urethral Resection of Bladder Tumour)
    • Vasectomy
    • Vasectomy Reversal
  • Mr Howard Marsh

    MBChB MD DRCS (Urol)

    • Circumcision
    • Prostate Resection (TURP)
    • TURBT (Trans-urethral Resection of Bladder Tumour)
    • Vasectomy
  • Mr Mark Cynk

    MB BS 1991: MB BS 1991 MSc (Urol) 2000 FRCS (Urol) 2000

    • Circumcision
    • TURBT (Trans-urethral Resection of Bladder Tumour)
    • Vasectomy Reversal